Politics
Politics, Policy and Regulation of green tech in Canada

News Briefs

  • H2O Innovation subsidiary lands new deals in US +

    H2O Innovation Inc.’s operation and maintenance (O&M) services subsidiary Utility Partners LLC (UP) has renewed two contracts and extended the Read More
  • EDC offers new green bond +

    Export Development Canada’s (EDC) latest green bond has been priced. Set at $500 million with a 1.8 fixed rate, the Read More
  • Capital Power moving ahead with New Frontier Wind +

    After Capital Power Corp. inked an agreement to sell 87% of the electricity generated from the yet to be constructed Read More
  • General Fusion takes new step towards reactor design +

    Vancouver’s General Fusion has hired two industry veterans to help lead the company through the development of a proof-of-concept fusion Read More
  • Federal, Ontario governments take big step in reducing diesel reliance in FN communities +

    The $60 million in federal funding to connect the Pikangikum First Nation to Ontario’s electricity grid is a major step Read More
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Stock Market

It’s widely recognized that Canada is pretty darned good at the research and development of innovations, including those in clean technology arena, but fails when it comes commercializing cleantech. Budget 2017 is attempting to fix what Canada doesn’t do well with both money and new approaches.

The federal government remains committed to innovation in the clean technology arena believing that it can not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions and act as a key plank to its climate action plans but also create jobs and grow the economy. Budget 2017 includes a number of measures aimed at encouraging more innovation in the cleantech area, while offering resources to get products and services to market.

Reducing Indigenous, rural and remote communities’ reliance on diesel fuel for electricity and heating is getting more money from the federal government. Budget 2017 is allocating approximately $640 million for these efforts.

The third annual Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue kicked off earlier this week with a discussion of how reducing emissions can grow the economy (more HERE). It continued on March 21 with a session of international leaders on using policy to attract investment.

For all the talk of renewable energy gets in Canada, particularly its role in being able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and clean the electricity grid even further, there is very little of it when it comes to role advanced nuclear energy could play. Simon Irish, the chief executive at emerging nuclear energy company Terrestrial Energy Inc., says that needs to change.